Zoe is in the SEA!!!

After 5 days of electrolysis
After 5 days of electrolysis

On Sept 8, 2016, we received our final signature from the government to install Zoe in an incredible home. Zoe touched the seafloor in Cozumel, Mexico on September 23, 2016.

Plans to be part of MUSA in Cancún were blocked due to challenges with our electrical and internet needs. Unlike the cement sculptures, Zoe requires more infrastructure.

Huge thanks to Ingmar Gonzalez Krotzsch for introducing me to Cozumel and uniting an incredible team! He envisioned exactly where it would go and – voilá! Isabel Caamaño Ricken, our brilliant coral biologist, applied for the final permit, along with her inventor brother, Pancho (Francisco) who together have a manifestation to place sculptures into this unique coral restoration lab and underwater art museum, Musubo. This Underwater Golden Diver Museum is a featured attraction of the annual Scuba Fest, organized by Gilda Sigie, who warmly invited Zoe to come to life in this special place.

Coral reef restoration installed in Cozumel
Zoe is in there!

Zoe is now in good company with bronze busts of Sylvia Earle, Jacques Cousteau, Ramón Bravo, and numerous Fractal Artificial Reefs and Reef Balls. Since 2006, the site aims to increase biodiversity and investigate coral regeneration after devastation from hurricanes and pollution. Sand Dollar Sports Dive Shop owner and project internet+electricity sponsor, John Flynn, and his dive guides want to reduce negative tourism impact on the natural reefs through rehabilitation and ecological recreation programs. You’ll see corals colonizing Zoe soon!

Qualti Innovaciones Marinas did a fabulous job installing with their hurricane-proof patented anchors. It was an underwater performance watching Laura and Pancho work skillfully in silent tandem. Thomas Sarkisian, electrical engineer from Global Coral Reef Alliance, has been awaiting over 5 years to turn on the electricity. Right after the switch was flipped on September 29th, the minerals began to deposit and fish started to arrive to eat the algae. YEA!!!

First two fish visiting coral reef restoration project
Our first two visitors

The marinero and capitán were key with the placement of Zoe and the camera into the sea. Here you see Pancho and Thomas preparing the Tilt Pan Zoom View into the Blue Camera to begin livestreaming. Trevor Mendelow has been configuring remotely with Danirel Alvarez Junco of Sand Dollar and the dedicated crew of Soluciones Xtreme Net who laid and wired our cables…a big production!

Blue Camera being installed in Cozumel coral reef restoration project
Blue Camera live stream being installed

My great great thanks to ALL OF YOU, my dear backers for being with me since the very beginning in 2011, and to the hundreds, thousands of others I’ve met along the journey that made this possible! Your contributions kept us going and the sheer number of you was constant motivation!!!!

new installation bio-rock coral reef restoration project Cozumel
October 4th, I took so many photos 🙂

You must come to the island to snorkel or dive. Only a 40 minute ferry ride from Playa Del Carmen (close to Cancún). Zoe is about 4m deep and open to the public. Very calm water and an ideal place to get certified in diving if thinking about it? Snorkeling is fine!

The water is crystal clear and fabulous for viewing our livestream. Content is underway for Zoecoral.com site built by amazing TED Fellow, longtime tech consultant and Zoe collaborator, Jen Indovina!

Many special thanks to my loving family, Luis Bourillón, Marisol Rueda Flores, José Luis Funes, Pedro Joaquin Coldwell, Serguei Rico, María Antonia Gonzalez, Lorenzo Rosenzweig Pasquel (FMCN), Lyn Ohala, TEDxCancún, Soluciones Xtreme Net, Staff of Sand Dollar Sports Dive Shop and Sunset Restaurant, Andrés Uscanga, Yibrán Aragón, Marenter, Todo Inoxidable, Infectango, SupporTED, Autodesk, Shaan Hurley, INapesca, UNAM, Cable Cozumel, the black bunny that just hopped by, and every friend, collaborator, acquaintance, coach not listed here who offered help, kindness, direction, mentoring, introductions, dancing, food, fun!!!

ALL of YOU are the reason. Logramos! Next phase, monitoring and colonizing ~~~

With love and fishes, Colleen and Living Sea Sculpture

Scrawled File Fish visiting Zoe coral reef restoration Cozumel

To follow on Facebook; twitter @livingseasculpt

Here to contribute to the monitoring, sensors, and maintenance

OpenROV in Quintana Roo

Just launched our expedition on Open Explorer. Hugely grateful to David Lang, Fellow TED Fellow and co-founder of OpenROV, for helping us to receive a grant to play with this new toy and tool.

Please follow along at ROVing the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef!

OpenROV 2.8 Mini Observation Class ROV
OpenROV 2.8 Mini Observation Class ROV

We’ll be ROVing in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico, starting in June. Very excited about this new Caribbean adventure with so many incredibly fun, caring, and brilliant people. Lots of complex ecosystems and biodiversity at stake, so we want to build momentum to protect and nurture our interdependence and learn from the past, present, and daily future.

I was just asked, so here you go~ ROV means remotely operated vehicle. Part of the Robotics glossary: An underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) is a mobile robot designed for aquatic work environments. Remote control is usually carried out through copper or fiber optic cables.
We should be receiving our ROV kit by end of month with hope to go out on first run to celebrate a birthday. Building an ROV and observing underwater life with loving friends – super way to begin a new year!!!

 

 

 

Fundación Aitana Connects with Corals

FundacioAitana6webGustavo Navarrette and I arrived at Fundación Aitana in Cancún on March 19th to give our Zoe Reef reFORMed art and science workshop to the fabulous children, their nurturing families, and generous volunteers. As always, my favorite part is being drawn into the unknown and the surprising results. It is like watching something bloom in real time as we feel and see our way forward in each emergent moment.

FundacionAitana3web
Making Papier-mâché corals

Everyone semi-consciously feeds each others’ curiosity to try different approaches to painting and creating. And the speed! Working in groups like this builds beautiful fluid momentum so that by the end of 2 or 3 hours, wow, so many corals and fish!

FundacionAitana17webConversations and laughter, it was really fun and inspiring to work with these kids who are cancer patients and survivors. Not once did it seem like anyone was ill, but they are at high risk and need local care facilities. Fundación Aitana is working to bring pediatric oncology to Cancún because they don’t have it. The families have to go hours to Merida, Cozumel, and beyond. This leads to huge expenses and deaths that could be avoided. Right now as I wrote that sentence I see a parallel with the corals, how they have diseases and need urgent care too. It is nice to have times where fun activities help us to enjoy and heal ourselves and other species in some way.  There is wonderful comforting connection in that.

FundacionAitana4web

 

 

 

On Our Radar

Respire – The Coral Corollary is acknowledged by Creative Capital’s On Our Radar through September 30th, 2015. Another highly competitive grant for artists, Creative Capital generously represents some 400 artist projects who made it to the 2nd or 3rd round of their selection process through their searchable database.

IMC respire1 from Colleen Flanigan on Vimeo.

This raw video I took one night while interactive technologist, James Tunick of The IMC LAB + GALLERY, and I were co-creating the 1st phase prototype of Respire gives a peek into our process for integrating sensor driven kinetic sculpture, audio, and video in an immersive installation. Also in this clip you can see the EKG-like screen which shows tidal data that drives the vertical movement of resin-covered plastic objects and bags found in waterways hanging in the background which were created by James Baker for his IMC show, Ebb and Flow.

My handheld shaky walk takes you to the small Biorock accretion tank with experimental mesh forms being electrified through seawater to precipitate mineral deposits.

photo colleen flanigan

The audio includes movie soundbites, something James Tunick explored. I had not thought about bringing voices into the project, so it was interesting to observe in myself and others how human voices and sci-fi memories stimulate a broad range of responses. I was also intrigued by his addition of morphing climate change and global graphics as surrounding projections. That is one of the best parts of collaborating, of course, trialing and riffing off of each other with curiosity as we dive into our imaginations, areas of expertise, and the unknown. Play and surprise is key.

Black/white video from actual iron lung footage in the 1940’s and 1950’s is spliced with vital coral imagery projected onto the “breathing coral” made with plastic bags sewn together over a steel sculpture to portray contrasts of vitality, mortality, and medical intervention. Breathing and movement of participants in the space, as well as ocean data, will continue to be the life force activating the exhibit.

In the next iteration, I imagine creating a very different feel and experience with the addition of an iron lung I purchased off ebay in 2012 so that the touring exhibit can more directly correlate to life support, concepts of technological advancement and cures for ailing coral reefs worldwide. Use of the ceiling has always been in the plan, and being in Mexico these past few months snorkeling and diving has shown me ocean illuminations that inspire how to bring a person in the land space to feel like they are in the sea, a sensory metaphor to being the coral. Whether you’re lying in the iron lung looking up after a “nurse” helps you inside, or you’re another observer interactor, I want to transport you, connect you with the non-verbal, fluid water animal that you are, breathing and reflecting, pulsing with a mysterious underwater corollary.

IMC exhibit

Respire 1.0 our first prototype
Respire 1.0 our first prototype

From the opening reception of the exhibit, TrashTara: It Starts with an Inhale on November 6th, until the closing reception on December 2nd, the Co-Create residency with James Tunick at THE IMC LAB + GALLERY continued in the backdrop. Unlike conventional gallery spaces, the 6th floor venue is a mixed-use morphing environment for artists and a few other small businesses to share. The Respire prototype and immersive installation truly gained a life of its own as James added interactive audio and visuals of data and living reefs projected onto the wall, ceiling, and kinetic sculpture.

Fellow artist-in-residence, Dan Baker’s, hanging art pieces made of retrieved plastic from local waterways were synced with data streams from an Alaskan tidal buoy in preparation for his upcoming exhibit, Ebb and Flow. A monitor showing the tides looked like an EKG. Though conceived separately, they added naturally to the concept and sensory media exploration. I brought over a small mineral accretion experiment I was working on at NYU in Natalie Jeremijenko’s XClinic to directly link coral health and innovation elements visually and physically to participants.

5 Gallon mineral accretion tank at IMC

Motion tracking was triggering the inhales and exhales of the Respire sculpture. The  electricity to the biorock mineral accretion tank was on the same outlet, so anyone moving in the space activated or deactivated the electricity; it was like watching life support go on and off. When the sculpture was idle, black and white images from iron lung artificial respiration projected onto the sculpture representing the bleached state of coral and the need for human action to restore vitality and prevent increased mortality. James and I will continue R&D to evolve the project, tying interactivity and effects more intimately with climate change, coral restoration and life support, and interdependent interspecies health.

And what about TrashTara? I had proposed to produce video and photos from my excursions to receive an LMCC grant. My first experience editing with final cut pro, it was a sweet feeling to observe the raw results, far from pro but close to my heart. Colby Cannon, Rob Bregman, and Dan Baker all gave me some quick tutorials. I grabbed poignant GoPro clips from my street outings together with some footage of me collecting butts day and night. Watching my selected snips of documentation linked together randomly led to a meaningful string of spontaneous interactions I had with people throughout Manhattan. I knew people would be receptive to cigarette butt recycling and pollution conversations if they were first uplifted by someone in a costume embodying a compassionate artwork. The face to face experience and kind moments were proof that impressions and attitude, perceptions and expectations are always operating consciously and subconsciously. Everything about the experience was socially enlightening for me and others, and hardly anyone I met knew that they could recycle butts in New Jersey at TerraCycle.

From EVGrieve blog post by Andrew (no last name)
TrashTara’s Butt Brigade Poster made in collaboration with Colby Cannon

The photo I used is from Scotland a few years ago when I was intrigued with arty butt shots before I was thinking about how that tiny remnant could harm marine life. NOTE:  I WANT $1 (or more!) to go towards coral restoration, but it is an ideal not yet real. Something to work towards.

Men of Sanitation NYC – TrashTara Knights

These guys made my night!

Perfect timing for TrashTara

I was walking back to THE IMC LAB + GALLERY now with a box of smashed grey tinted glass I just swept up off the street (my dog, Plum found it) thinking,”I still need ‘sand’ for the art show this week.” Shredded paper was my earlier thought, and there it was – 4 bags of thinly julienned paper. Exactly at that moment, these guys drove up to take it away as I was working out how to carry 2 bags, come back for 2, leave 2..
Me: Can I leave 2 and come back?
Guy : Sure, but you have to come back or I’ll get in trouble.
Me: Ok,..no, I only need 2..
He’s about to put bags into the truck.
Me: Wait! I might need all 4…
One guy: where are you going?
Me: 6th…2 avenues.
Guy: I tell you what, I just need to go around one more block and I’ll meet you on the corner of 22nd and 6th.

photo by Colleen Flanigan

And they even took my heavy box of glass. When they turned the corner at 22nd, it was like, I don’t know, getting picked up at the airport by old friends (with a garbage truck).

Matryoshka Principle. Steel, plastic, glass, paper, sand. 2014

The paper and the glass were used in this installation piece in the Manhattan show, TrashTara: It Starts with an Inhale.

Art and FILCO

TrashTara : It Starts with An Inhale

I was walking in the East Village with my dog, stopping for him to pee and for me to take a photo of a cigarette butt flattened in a crack in the sidewalk, when it struck me – are these recyclable? They’re everywhere. Beyond grabbing my attention for arty butt shots, they really shouldn’t be everywhere I look. Turns out, yes, they are recyclable. And that was it. I finally knew WHAT TrashTara would be collecting in her Catch-All…

Since late April, I’ve been a Co-Create Artist in Residence at The IMC LAB + GALLERY, owned by James Tunick and Carrie Elston-Tunick. Loving it! While here, I’ve created my latest alter ego, TrashTara, and been out on the streets of Manhattan. She/me has been hand-collecting those butts, the most littered object in the world, while talking to people and gathering footage with a GoPro.

TrashTara in Tompkins Square Park, East Village. Photo courtesy of Stanley Raffes.

Most people don’t know that cigarette butts are such a huge problem for the environment or that they can be recycled. After the last relaxing drag, there’s satisfaction in flicking them to the ground to roll their way into cracks, storm drains, and gutters.

Strom drain on Ave B in East Village

It needs to seep into the mainstream knowledge that cigarettes have non-biodegradable plastic filters, and that nicotine is a very toxic pesticide. Each butt could spend 10 years tossing around in the ocean and water supply killing wildlife and polluting ourselves. One cigarette butt can kill fish in a liter of water. TerraCycle has initiated placing receptacles in cities around the world, and inviting people to join their butt brigades to send in cigarette butts. I’d like to set up a TrashTara Butt Brigade so that every pound of butts collected by those collaborating with me will result in $1 towards Living Sea Sculpture coral reef habitat.

TrashTara’s Catch-All

The tar-filled filters can be cleaned and transformed into plastic pallets, anti-corrosives for steel, and textiles. If we can get the 4.5 trillion of them off the ground and into the up-cycling circuit – I heard SF spends $11 million each year on cigarette collection alone – we can save lots of lives and money.

When TrashTara is out at night, her headdress, or as synthetic biologist, Oliver Medvedik, co-founder of GenSpace calls it, her “GMO Tiara,” has fluorescing proteins that come from corals and jellies. With the addition of Ultra Violet LEDs, the GFP and RFP glow.  I wanted to avoid plastic resins, and am fascinated with bioluminescence and fluorescence in nature, so we collaborated to create a potentially controversial object. Synthetic biology is complex; the layers of ethics, philosophy, politics, and science involved in genetic research are many and divisive, so I’m grateful I had the opportunity to experiment with proteins as paints to get closer to the reality of how vast this field is and how the concept of “GMO” is completely unknown to most of us in a hands-on way.

TrashTara buttpicking in Gramercy

Also for the upcoming show, James Tunick and I have been developing the first prototypes for Respire – The Coral Corollary, an interactive, multimedia immersive exhibit correlating coral health with human health incorporating data, kinetic sculpture, audio and video so that through their senses and emotions, participants feel connected to corals, the living, breathing animals and plants that share our world with us and take care of us in so many ways. They need us to redesign how we perceive and intersect with their habitat if they are to survive. James is programming micro-controllers that sense human participant and ocean data to trigger responsive movement, lighting, and effects in the sculptures and space.

I hope you can come to the show! TrashTara will be at the opening.

photo by Colby Cannon

 

 

 

 

 

Too shallow? Can this be true?!

Putting our heads together to solve the latest puzzle: Nizuc Resort and Spa is ready to house ZOE. Yea!! They want to celebrate it, publicize, make it quite happy with simple swank elegant parties for people of taste. Any issues with guests having to wear weird shaming bracelets to snorkel a few meters can be worked out with the government.
Cool! this is easy and delightful somehow, I’m thinking. And feels pretty loving, reminiscent of the blissful dream I had just before waking in which Roberto Diaz (pictured), Pres. of MUSA/manager of Aquaworld, was wearing a robe from the same fabric as a dress I got for this trip. We had our heads together in the dream and the feeling was that we were in love. Not IN LOVE like hot-I-want-YOU love, but that comfort that our hearts and minds, souls and hopes were wanting things to happen for the better of culture and conservation however that plays out. Somehow we were “wearing” our synergy.Cut to snorkeling – wow, this is damn shallow. Let’s just walk around on the sandy seafloor a bit figuring how to make the sculpture shrink or the sea level rise a bit faster. Not quite that shallow, but not much higher than the 2M of ZOE. How can we make this deeper? Clearly that IS the problem with this place.  Gena Bezanilla, Executive Director of MUSA, was on the boat with us imagining how ZOE would look if it was half-size.  Possible?

OK, let’s all swim around the other sculptures in MUSA, look at all pros and cons of this resort, and put Colleen in a BOB tomorrow to see if that area of Punta Cancun where there are already approved plans for a 3rd exhibition gallery for MUSA might be perfect for ZOE. It’s 18′ deep, aqua blue waters, snorkeling and diving, and the Park wants to regenerate corals in the area that was hit hard by Hurricane Wilma. (Apparently a 400 ton sunken ship was torn in half and thrown 100M. Serious Act of God.)

Roberto told me so much about his adventures since starting MUSA with Jaime and Jason in 2009. The moral of this very longass FB post: do it because you love it, Colleen. There is no glory, often no thanks, and who wants to be a quitter? Roberto is also a sculptor with a piece in the museum. I’m grateful for his sensitive, generous far-seeing soul. (She says before getting on an underwater scooter with a bubble on her head. I’ll let you know if I feel so warm fuzzy tomorrow.)

BOB Aquaworld Adventures in Cancun

Birthday wishes

It’s my birthday.  Not Living Sea Sculpture’s birthday, Colleen Flanigan’s.  What did I wish for?  I wished that I would continue to only pay attention to signs of love and stay wide open to all the good around, and that the Living Sea Sculpture in Mexico would be installed.

First wish is totally happening! Second wish is on its way.  I’ve been communicating with individuals and people in organizations every day as I intuit and research who to reach out to next to clear the path into the sea for ZOE (previously titled DNA Dividing).  MUSA has a new executive director who has offered some assistance, and the founders of the underwater museum were supposed to be meeting last week to add “more efforts.”  The Mexican Consulate in New York, the Tourism Board, people who know people in Akumal and Cancun, Oceanus in Chetumal, The Nature Conservancy, The World Bank,…I am reaching out to complete this exciting chapter for coral colonies that has been filled with politics and slow steps towards economic, social, and ecological transformation.

Which makes me jump to yesterday.  I went on a birthday art outing with a friend to see Kara Walker’s, “a Subtlety,” or “The Marvelous Sugar Baby,” made of sugar at the soon to be demolished Domino Sugar Factory in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

"a Subtlety" by Kara Walker. Presented by Creative Time at the Domino Sugar Factory.

This political, visual homage to mistreated humans is poignant to our present day humanitarian desire to create healthier relationships with other species and our living environment.  It might seem like a stretch, but for me and many others who want to restore dying ecosystems and think big picture long term, abuse and disrespect of a group of people in many ways is similar to abuse and disrespect of other species and natural resources; both are perpetuated by the greed and pervasive ignorance of “authority.”

Kara Walker's installation at the Domino Sugar Factory

At this free exhibit, open through July 6th on Fridays and weekends, thousands are flocking to see the sculptural sugar interpretations of people who were repressed and treated as commodities by others lording over them with calculating, callous power.  This large-scale public work would have been impossible to imagine as something to be accepted, let alone publicly and culturally honored, 40 years ago.  Change happens fast.  Change happens slowly.

Kara describes the work:

“An homage to the unpaid and overworked artisans who have refined our sweet tastes from the cane fields to the kitchens of the new world on the occasion of the demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant.”

For the sake of metaphor, we can insert other species into context as the “artisans”: those who are not being seen for their worth.  With so much red tape and destructive human forces killing without conscience or logic, when in the 21st century will society reach critical momentum to recognize ourselves in other living beings, and then take it a step further, and make decisions with their well-being in mind?  Steps forward and steps back, all along the winding path there are those who operate from places of love, trust, and ambitious equality.

Many artists fall into that lump. Art emerges from imagination linking concepts, emotions, skills, and materials. It is largely underestimated and undervalued in all its forms, even though it is the medium that can reveal multitudes of meaning and guidance because its essence is sensing, “seeing,” and expressing with impact.

Through this carefully planned, impressive construction, Kara Walker molded a story of a painful history of repression and offered a unique form of care and respect.  Witnessing the sugar – it was saying a lot in silence – I was not so subtly reminded of where we come from, and where we can go if we choose.  I felt levity in the space, possibly because so many of us never knew this specific era personally, and possibly because of all the white light and visitors. I was in awe at her monumental work built from our sweetener to shed light on a dark secret.

"a Subtlety" by Kara Walker at the Domino Sugar Factory, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reef reFORMed

Welcome the Year of the Horse!

A big year for travel. And all you Oxes working so hard in 2014, it will pay off.  Watch out, Rats, not to get under any hooves.   And as a Pig myself, I’m glad I didn’t know 2013 was supposed to be horrible for me because it was great in so many ways.

 

Here we see coral propagating like a Chinese New Year’s fireworks show. Watch it Grow on the 1″ scale model of a Living Sea Sculpture soon to be installed in Mexico.

January 28th was TEDxSpence, a youth event in Manhattan.  An inspiring day of talks and workshops with super girls at the school.  Below is the 3rd version of Reef reFORMed in New York.  I wanted to capture the improvisational sculptural installation, so tried low-tech time-lapse for the first time with iStopMotion on an iPad.  The 7-9th graders opted for 6 second intervals.  Here’s what happened in a couple hours~

 

Obstacles MELTING in Cancun

I just returned from a visit to Cancun to clear the way for installation of the DNA Dividing sculpture into Punta Nizuc asap.  It was a fabulous trip.  Cleansing and liberating to feel the weight of waiting, some sort of peripheral crunching burden, dissolving and leaving light water vapors in its wake.

To follow the story, please visit here for the beginning.  And here is today’s latest update on kickstarter.

 

Artists Envisioning Sea Level Rise

"You Are An Island," Artwork by Alicia Eggert. Photo Colleen Flanigan DUMBO Arts Festival, 2013

Two incredible friends, well, many more than that when you look at all the people who will be required to bring these epic public art projects into being, are putting their creative energy towards expressing the reality of sea level rise and flooding.  They are targeting urban places to interject something premonitory and visible. These artists are translating scientific data, personal observation, and human gut reaction into visionary humanitarian offerings.  Using very different formats, they are inviting people to reflect about the effects of climate change and water events that will flow and submerge all in its path.

Heidi Quante used to be Creative Coordinator for 350.org. Now she’s teamed up with artist, Eve Mosher, to realize HighWaterLine in multiple locations. In 2007, Eve felt compelled to start chalking the streets in Manhattan, “I marked the 10-feet above sea level line by drawing a blue chalk line and installing illuminated beacons in parks. The line marks the extent of increased flooding brought on by stronger and more frequent storms as a result of climate change. I walked, chalked and marked almost 70 miles of coastline. As I was out in the public creating the work, I had a chance to engage in conversations about climate change and its potential impacts.”  The fact that New York IS an Island, with highly deteriorated oyster reefs and no other sufficient breakwaters, makes it extremely vulnerable to storms, as experienced with Hurricane Sandy nearly a year ago.

Florida flood plains are being chalked this November, and London and Philadelphia are slated for 2014.  Florida is in direct line for hurricanes and floods, so Eve and Heidi want to empower the neighborhoods that will be deluged by giving them means to physically mark the estimated perimeter of the floods. The project is as much about process as result. The chalk marker is passed from community to community to feed the grassroots project. So many people don’t feel welcome in making important decisions, or on the flip side, they feel entitled to overpower.  This art is egalitarian. It creates a map in real space as a step to begin planning to divert catastrophe. The locals who will be directly affected are being given tools and ideas to further plot their own communally developed course of action in the case of disaster.  HighWaterLine is a feat of community organizing through conceptual, public art.

Lars Jan, Director of Early Morning Opera and a TED Senior Fellow, is deep into the making of HOLOSCENES, a large-scale performance installation intended for urban public spaces. In this video, watch someone try to make ramen in am elevator-sized aquarium while water fills and drains, driven by a hydraulic system capable of pumping fifteen tons of water in one minute.

“The man ‘making ramen’ is simulating a behavior documented in a 10 minute video submitted by a Japanese graduate student in his dorm in Tokyo.  This student is Shun Oka, previously my student at Swarthmore College.  Apparently Shun makes ramen nearly everyday, and I have to admit he has his own particular way of going about it.  There are more steps to making ramen than I could have ever imagined — very different from the instant version I associate with US college kitchens.  By the end of the first time I watched his video, my mouth was watering.  In turn, the creative team behind Holoscenes simulated this behavior and made our own video in which a figure is deluged repeatedly, but goes on making ramen all the while.  Though I find the video more ostensibly humorous than others we’ve made so far, I also find this submission from Japan particularly resonant given the intrusion of the tsunami into the everyday at Fukushima.” – Lars Jan

Watching the videos, I feel zen, not panicked.  It makes me want to practice getting out of a car if it gets tossed off a bridge in an earthquake.  Something about breaking the horror  into bite size vignettes is soothing and makes it possible to imagine the traumatic potentiality, or the reality for many along the coast, in a way that evokes the personal and mundane that is at the core of long-term design, viable approaches, and progressive solutions.

The beauty of the dancer -she looks like an hibiscus flower slowly blooming and wilting in a rain puddle- makes me breathe into my imagination and dispel any alienating fear that mucks up mental space.  Lars’ work delivers eye-opening information through new media and seductive interactive means so all individuals can claim their vital roles in balancing world ecology.

A young woman in LA who still uses a land line.

A young woman in LA who still uses a land line.*

Artists synthesize and relay layered multi-sensory experiences so adeptly.  These are just two examples of the growing cultural opportunities to recognize that both little and big actions are required to meet the future. Little acts really do have big impact to blow old paradigms out of the water.

With so many variables to consider, leaving things to the government, academic institutions, and people perceived as authority figures are common excuses to just wait and see, and then blame someone else, but with the US Government taking a break right now to squabble (embarrassing!), it’s a good time to remember the unique, often unsung, brilliance of our neighbors next door and online.  What amazing brain power and community will is within reach to calmly consider how we might respond when overwhelming storms forcefully release our most valuable, powerful resource  – water. (I’ll think about the sun in another post.)

"You Are an Island" by Alicia Eggert. Photo Colleen Flanigan DUMBO Arts Festival, 2013

*The sale of archival prints supports the continued development of the Holoscenes performance through 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

Breathing Sculpture

U-Ram Choe creates artworks that capture an aliveness and qualities of graceful organisms by using metals, plastics, and the latest in computer programming technologies. Based in Korea, he is inspired by…

I started this post awhile ago, but perfectionism, thus procrastination, got in the way.  I promised to write a post once a week, and it has been a month since I last posted.  I am going to post whatever I write in these next 10 minutes knowing full well that edits and revisions are important for certain clarity, but what if sometimes I can just share whatever is on my mind and be more real and in the moment, as if I’m in casual conversation.

I had a major artcrush on this sculpture that I sadly missed seeing when it was on view at the Asia Society here in NY last year.  There is an Iran Modern show opening there today that looks interesting.  You have until January 5th to visit.
I reached out to U-Ram in an email because his video, with the music and caring way it was filmed, I felt like I could touch a bit of what I want to bring to life through a project.  I imagined taking a trip to Korea to visit his studio and meet his creative team.  It was a moment of feeling like you have found kin through an inspirational expression of matter.

The work I’m developing is different in form and content, except for the fact that breathing and making something inanimate seem alive ties them together.  His mastery of mechanics with those fluidly undulating gears.  What can I say?  It’s ultra sexy metalwork.

If you are not familiar with this incredible artist’s works, you can find more about him here.

 

Crafthaus Exhibit and University of Oregon’s Full Spectrum

“I’m grading student work and who do I see? looking at me.” That was a welcome surprise tweet from @JessicaLeeGreen- University of Oregon professor, TED Senior Fellow, friend and colleague.

Restoring our Reefscape was posted by Shelby Adkisson. The Full Spectrum Biology blog is being created by students in the courses Population Ecology and Biological Diversity at the University of Oregon. It is one component of their work, and for each course will unfold throughout the term. +Jessica Green

Crafthaus curator, Greg Corman, created an online exhibit, Sculpture for Wildlife Habitat. It will be up from June 8 – July 8, and then the images will be in their archive.  For the love of bees, birds, seas…very earthy. 1970’s meets the 2000’s.

Reef re-FORMed: A Biorock Simulation

From May 2nd – May 8th, I was invited to transform a shop in DUMBO, New York, into a pop-up gallery.  Preview of the Arts and the THE CREATORS COLLECTIVE initiated a preview parlor for passers-by to experience the creative process through the premier of new works and revisited projects in a non-traditional gallery space.  Numerous artists creating dance, showing installations, and hanging wall art made site-specific projects for the glassed-in shop at 145 Front St. in Brooklyn.

Photo by John Busche

The video scenes of growing Biorock coral sculptures and underwater propagation projected on the wall in the background lured divers and ocean lovers, as well as those just curious people who found themselves meandering through a labyrinthine shopping mall.

The crocheted and needle-felted community reef was donated by Gossamer Fiber Arts in Portland, OR, back in 2008.  I’ve used it on multiple occasions for awareness and restoration re-enactments.  Thanks to Al Atarra, who runs the The Metropolitan Exchange, “a cooperative of creative professionals in Downtown Brooklyn”, I received metal from architect, Marc Fornes’ discarded designs.  That, plus some thick, flexible insulated cable was fun to reassemble into a rocky reef formation with Nick from A New Seed NYC. (somehow his last name was never spoken. He is “Nick from a New Seed”)

Needle-felted octopus by Susan Lake. Photo John Busche

The octopus gets a lot of high praise.  She almost missed this show;  luckily for all, it worked out.  Also, Downtown Yarns in Manhattan granted us a few additions to the reef, including a chambered nautilus.

My goal to do work in the ocean and share it on land keeps evolving.  For the past 3 years, I’ve been developing a concept and collecting who, how, where for an interactive, multimedia installation that correlates human health with coral health in a unique, artistic way.  I see it in my mind’s eye, and will soon show you some of the visuals and technologies that are helping me get closer.

There are incredible, interdisciplinary artists using robotics and sensory programs to reveal natural movement and data with kinetic sculptures.  They’re able to create intricate poetry and awe with movement and form.  The depth of intimacy they have with their process, from conceiving to making, is an expression of mastery, curiosity, love and dedication to bringing life-animated to technology. Somehow it seems like this investigation will have a positive feedback loop: inviting people to fall in love again with wild and mysterious beautiful plants and animals. One could argue that it might make people fall in love with robots, but I leave that open to never-ending discussion and reflection.