Turtles Tortugas in Akumal Bay

"ZOE" at Puerto Cancun 2011. Photo by Mike Gerzevitz.

I was recently in Mexico again. From Cancun to Akumal to Isla Mujeres, I was working on clearing our way to install the DNA-inspired sculpture into the ocean.  I brought a friend and technical adviser, Jennifer Indovina of Tenrehte, along to help me scout out the best locations for wifi and power sources since we are now going to be adding webcams to this coral, fish, and biodiversity refuge.  She is building a custom website so you will be able to watch the evolution of the coral reef ecosystem as a virtual aquarium.

I rented a camera to capture some of the underwater life and to document potential sites for this sculpture or possibly future ones.  We were swimming out from shore to look at the set up for the TurtleCams they have in Akumal Bay,

TurtleCams power supply - A View into the Blue and teens4Oceans project in collaboration with Centro Ecológico Akumal (CEA)

and that’s when green turtles began to appear right below us.  They were grazing on the sea grasses. I didn’t know what to expect of their behavior.  They had a very casual easygoing style.  From my short experience observing, I’d say they are calm, mildly curious, and like to socialize with their other grazing companions.  When they swam up to the surface for gulps of air, they glided like graceful, slow-flying birds.  They seem like gentle beasts that have become trusting from so many tourists, yet are not interested in interacting in any way.

Swimming in Akumal Bay. Photo by Colleen Flanigan.

The area needs a new sewage treatment plant, which is one of the reasons the water gets so murky. If you visit the Yucatan Peninsula and stay at a hotel, ask the managers if they deep inject their sewage.  Long story, but water treatment is a huge issue in Mexico. Corals are much more sensitive to certain pollutants than humans. The movie, Angel Azul by Marcy Cravat, does a beautiful job sharing about the pollution through the intersection of art and science working for the environment in the underwater museum, MUSA.  She started with the story of artist, Jason deCaires Taylor, and like any good detective, she followed emerging clues, piecing together a puzzling and illuminating truth about our unsustainable systems and areas ripe for transformation.

It has been almost 3 years since we made the DNA sculpture in Cancun, so it was slightly bittersweet (chocolate) to see the steel sculpture making cameos in the background at Puerto Cancun as Jason’s and other cement sculptures were being deployed by boat. More sweet than bitter, actually, since I was so moved by the excellent filmmaking and knowing all the people and places in it.  It made things even more real. I’m committed to completing this project and to growing relationships in the region through this journey.  The sculpture is not in the water yet because of complications with land permits for the power source, but the ecosystem of diverse, caring people involved in this important ecological story is evolving, and so are our visions.  A few years isn’t that long in geological and bureaucratic time. BUT, since I’m a human trying to help save corals dying at rapid rates~  IN THE WATER IN 2014!

To the Future. Photo by Colleen Flanigan, 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obstacles MELTING in Cancun

I just returned from a visit to Cancun to clear the way for installation of the DNA Dividing sculpture into Punta Nizuc asap.  It was a fabulous trip.  Cleansing and liberating to feel the weight of waiting, some sort of peripheral crunching burden, dissolving and leaving light water vapors in its wake.

To follow the story, please visit here for the beginning.  And here is today’s latest update on kickstarter.

 

Crafthaus Exhibit and University of Oregon’s Full Spectrum

“I’m grading student work and who do I see? looking at me.” That was a welcome surprise tweet from @JessicaLeeGreen- University of Oregon professor, TED Senior Fellow, friend and colleague.

Restoring our Reefscape was posted by Shelby Adkisson. The Full Spectrum Biology blog is being created by students in the courses Population Ecology and Biological Diversity at the University of Oregon. It is one component of their work, and for each course will unfold throughout the term. +Jessica Green

Crafthaus curator, Greg Corman, created an online exhibit, Sculpture for Wildlife Habitat. It will be up from June 8 – July 8, and then the images will be in their archive.  For the love of bees, birds, seas…very earthy. 1970’s meets the 2000’s.

Pinning Inspiration

When I recently saw a ficus leaf mineral thru an electron microscope on pinterest, it reminded me of this piece from about 15 years ago. When I made it, I’d never seen a ficus leaf mineral, but I love how interrelated so many forms and patterns of nature appear to be, whether you’ve ever seen them to influence you or not.

Catching Glimpses in the Gloaming, 1998. Crocheted copper wire, cast silver dogwood blossoms, fake eyelashes, fake fur, steel wire. Photo Courtney Frisse

“I can’t even look at it,” ran through my head whenever I would see the little pin it icon. “Pinterest is going to distract me from important things.”

But now I’m coalescing Nature Patterns onto a digital board that kind of tweaks the in-love chemistry in my brain.  Pinning before bed has catalyzed beautiful, vivid dreams; something about the free associative process of following this intricate thread of visual networks is soothing while stimulating creativity. To be able to float through images, seeing some things I never knew existed in the world, is like cranking the amperage on curiosity and getting a fascination fix.

Every time I pin onto this board, I’m adding inspirational matter for future Living Sea Sculptures.  As I gravitate towards images, I see a collage emerging; it’s a valuable personal palette made from the communal well of web surfing and discovery.  Microscopic bacteria, bike chains, textiles, lava flows, and biology on land and sea reflect and imitate each other as they assemble into rivulets, orbs, bumps and repetitions. Physical forces, changing pressure and process has resulted in these…these moments captured in photographs and stills.  Somehow there is motion and color telling a story, a lifelong history embedded in the pictures, and that wordless-ness attracts and suggests new models for ocean habitat.

Sculptural porcelain by Nuala O'Donovanj

Curvilinear

This blog will be a curvilinear stream of consciousness.  A stream between both hemispheres of my brain, and yours. Living Sea Sculpture is more than an object, it is an intricate web of life, philosophy, and process.  Dot-to-dot drawings are predetermined,

fish balloon and fox

Transportation: dot-to-dot pages

but as we build our lives, we are lucky to have the freedom to connect whatever “dots” we choose or notice.  I am happy to be starting this conversation, what I hope will become an ongoing international conversation, about all aspects of human interaction with our coastal cousins.

Over the years, I realize there’s not a place for people to talk freely about coral restoration and marine ecosystem solutions in a personal and informal way.  Why?  All the details and ins and outs of processes, people, organisms are tied together intimately.

Lots of blogs and articles (and me) have repeatedly relayed the information about Biorock reefs (…low volt direct current precipitates limestone minerals to deposit…alkaline buffer zone..grow faster, survive warming…).  Other man-made reefs and coral nurseries have some glowing moments on green sites and in nature magazines also, yet the conclusion is the same: through a portrait of this man (fill in the blank) we can make the point that corals and other animals are endangered due to human activities and here is a sort of lone hero  bucking the odds. The odds may be stacked, but that is the call to ACT.

Wherever you are with whatever you know, you know enough to enter this conversation and have incredible impact. We can build new projects and coral conservatories together if we find each other.

I just read an article that said waiting for government or big corporations to take the lead on this is not the way.  Agreed. They will get involved, they are involved, and individuals from all backgrounds need inlets to get involved too.  Being nimble is an asset.  Coral restoration is not rocket science (although you can be a rocket scientist and do it); it is a practice and technology that grows out of a desire to cultivate healthier relationships with ourselves and our planet, to heal what is not well and find fun and adventure along the way.

Maybe you just have a fascination with playing with organic matter.  Whether you approach it as a gardener who longs for beautiful form and colorful vitality, an engineer who “knows” there is a better way to electrify an artificial reef (talk to me), a fisherman who needs fish, a scientist who wants to study the effects of low volt current on Zooxanthellae within coral polyps, a homeowner who doesn’t want to be washed to sea, a resort owner who woos tourists, an artist that makes sculpture, a diver that breathes underwater…

I’m not sure why I took so long to start this.  I have a lot to say and want to hear from you.  If you are part of the Living Sea Sculpture diaspora waiting to find your homeland, Welcome!

Hydnophora- Biorock experiement at SeaHorse Aquarium. photo by Clay Connally, 2011